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  • Erratum
  • Open Access

Erratum to: weight management interventions in adults with intellectual disabilities and obesity: a systematic review of the evidence

  • 1, 2,
  • 2 and
  • 3Email author
Nutrition Journal201413:123

https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2891-13-123

  • Received: 10 November 2014
  • Accepted: 24 November 2014
  • Published:

The original article was published in Nutrition Journal 2013 12:132

Correction

Following the publication of this article [1], we noted errors to Table six (Table 1 here). Corrected version is presented below.
Table 1

Multi-component interventions

Study/ Location/ Type

Participants

Intervention

Follow up

Results

Jackson 1982 [31]

Gender: all females

Duration: 14 weeks of every 2 weeks group sessions (60 min each) led by a teacher.

17 weeks

(a) Mean weight change, kg: -5.75b

(b) Mean weight change, kg:-0.59

Australia

(a) Treatment group

(a) 7 sessions with the parents, 6 sessions with group members and the teacher. Diet: Advice on healthy eating diet, avoid fad diets. Activity: General advice on physical activity e.g. using stairs instead of elevator. Behaviour: self-monitoring, reward, punishment, change of rate of eating, reinforcement.

3 month

(a) Mean weight change, kg :-6.25

(b) Mean weight change, kg :-0.59

6 month

(a) Mean weight change, kg: -6.08

(b) Mean weight change, kg: +0.33

Community

n = 6

Maintenance: none reported

12 month

(a) Mean weight change, kg: -7.33

Quasi-experimental study with a control group

Weight status: 10 % overweight

(b) No intervention

(b) Mean weight change, kg: 0.00

Age (years), mean: 21.8

Significant weight reduction of (a) across all the follow up

ID, mean IQ : 38.17

(b) Control group

n = 6

Age (years), mean: 23.5

ID, mean IQ :40.33

Attrition/drop out: none

Harris 1984 [32]

Total n = 21

Duration: 7 weekly group sessions and 1 hour booster session 26 weeks after the first session.

7 week

(a) Mean weight change, kg:-3.0 (p < 0.05) b

USA

Weight status: not reported

(a) Diet: education on healthy balanced diet, distinguishing high and low calorie foods, diabetic exchange diet (ADA, 1977). Activity: 5–10 min aerobic exercise at the end of session. Behaviour: stimulus control, self-monitoring, self-reinforcement, goal setting, self-contacting. Carers attended the sessions.

12 months

(a) Mean weight change, kg :-0.76

Community

(a) Completers

Maintenance: none reported

(b) Mean weight change, kg :+2.39 (p < 0.05)

Quasi-experimental study with a comparison group

n = 10

(p < 0.05)

Gender: 8 females, 2 males

Age (years) a: 22.7(6.37)

ID, IQ a : 52.5 (12.80)

(b) Non completers: 11

Attrition/drop out: 11

Ewing 2004 [33]

(a) participants with ID

Duration: 8 week intervention. The “HELP” intervention (Health Education Learning Program) led by health educators. 8 group sessions and 2 to 4 home visits.

2 months

(a) Mean BMI change, kg/m2 : 0 b

USA

Total n = 154, final n = 92

Diet: a home visit to develop dietary plan and do a grocery visit. Activity: a home visit to develop an exercise programme e.g. walking routes, optional brisk walk after the sessions. Behaviour: motivation to change, relapse prevention, avoidance of “automatic thinking”.

(b) Mean BMI change, kg/m2: -0.89

Community

Weight status, BMIa: 35.4 (7.0)

Maintenance: none reported

No significant difference between (a) and (b)

Quasi-experimental study with a comparison group

Gender: 54.4 % females

Age (years) a : 39.7 (11.5)

ID, IQa : 50.2 (14.3)

Attrition/drop out: 18.8 %

(b) no ID

Total n = 270, final n = 97

Weight status, BMIa:38.4 (8.6)

Gender: 84.5 % females

Age (years) a:49.9 (11.48)

Attrition/drop out: 30 %

Study/Location/Type

Participants

Intervention

Follow up

Results

Mann 2006 [34]

Total n = 324, available data for 192

Duration: 8 weekly group sessions (90 min each) using health education “Steps to Your Health” led by trained staff . Included home visits.

9 weeks

Mean BMI change, kg/m2: -0.31b (p < 0.05)

USA

Weight status, BMIa : 35.38 (6.85)

Diet: individual dietary plan and a grocery store visit. Activity: optional brisk walking and individual exercise programme. Behaviour: motivation to change, relapse prevention, barriers to change.

Community

Gender:66.7 % females, 33.3 % males

Maintenance: none reported

Uncontrolled quasi-experimental study

Age (years) a : 38.6 (11.5)

ID, IQa : 50.7 (13.3)

Attrition/drop out: 20 %

Bazzano 2009 [35]

Total n = 85 signed up, 44 completers

Duration: 7 months of 2 weekly group sessions (120 min each) led by professionals specialized in ID. “The Healthy Lifestyle Programme” focusing on health education and peer mentoring. Phone calls included.

7 months

Mean weight change, kg:-1.2 (p < 0.05) b

USA

Weight status: 36.4 % overweight, 38.6 % obese, 18.2 % very obese

Diet: education and cooking demonstration. Activity: education and supervised physical activity (90 min). Exercise in local parks and fitness facilities. Behaviour: behaviour modification and reward systems. Carers were encouraged to attend the sessions.

Mean BMI change, kg/m2: -0.5 (p < 0.05) b

Community

Gender: 61 % females, 39 % males

Maintenance: none reported

Uncontrolled quasi-experimental study

Age (years): 18-59

ID: 68 % mental retardation, 25 % ≈ mental retardation, Cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and autism diagnosed in 15 % to 20 %

Attrition/ drop out: 35 %

Geller 2009 [36]

Total n = 45

(a): Empowerment model. 1st year: Twice weekly sessions led by a physician (60 min each): Group and individual sessions based on the “Funk” model. Diet: meal planning, cooking demonstrations. Activities: music chairs, dancing, exercise to music. Behaviour: Activities creating feelings of community, feelings of success and of being important.

2 months

(a) + (b) (n = 43) Mean weight change, kg:-0.26b

6 months

(a) + (b) (n = 38) Mean weight change, kg:-0.78

12 months

(a) + (b) (n = 36) Mean weight change, kg:-0.74

18 months

(a) + (b) (n = 14) Mean weight change, kg:-2.73

USA

Gender: 25 females, 18 males

(b): 2nd year, once weekly group sessions -same as (a)

Community

Weight status: obese/ overweight:-Age (years): average 42.6

Weight maintenance: none reported

Uncontrolled quasi-experimental study

ID: not reported

Attrition/ drop out: 2 dropped out, 14 completed 18 month measurements

Melville 2011 [37]

Total n = 54

Duration: 6 months of 9 sessions every 2–3 weeks individual consultations (45-60 min each) based on the GCWMS led by a dietician and a medical graduate.

6 months

Mean weight change, kg (SD): -4.47 (4.45) (p < 0.0001) b

UK

Weight status, BMIa : 40 (8.03)

Diet: 600 kcal/d energy deficit diet. Activity: aim for 30 min of moderate physical activity for 5 days per week. Behaviour: goal setting, problem solving, cue avoidance, stimulus control. Carers were encouraged to assist if needed.

 

Mean BMI change, Kg/m2:-1.82 (p < 0.0001)

Community

Gender:40.7 % males, 59.3 % females

Maintenance: none reported

Uncontrolled quasi-experimental study

Age (years)a:48.3 (12.01)

ID: 31.5 % mild, 31.5 % moderate, 35.2 % severe, 1.9 % profound.

Attrition/drop out: 3 dropped out, 4 non completers on time

Study/ Location/ Type

Participants

Intervention

Follow up

Results

Saunders 2011[38]

Total n = 79 registered, Weight status: mean BMI 38.0

Duration: 6 months of one individual session (60-90 min) and monthly consultations (30 min each) led by dietician, behaviour analysts, physiologists.

6 months

(n = 73) Mean weight change, kg:-6 b

USA

Gender: 41 % males, 59 % females

Diet: a 1200 to 1300 kcal/d diet based on volumetrics, at least 5 portions of fruits and vegetables; up to three low-calorie, meal/snack-replacement shakes; two packaged entrees of less than 300 calories each and other low calorie items, 2 shake mixes from Health Management Resources (HMR) daily (110 kcal per serving). Activity: Optional. A game board aiming to increase number of steps. Behaviour: praise, problem solving, reward system. Carers could assist if needed.

Mean BMI change kg/m2 ≈ -2.7 % mean weight loss: 6.3

Community

(6 month completers)

Maintenance: 6 months of less intensive meetings. Weight loss could continue if wanted.

Uncontrolled quasi-experimental study

ID: not reported

Attrition/drop out: 73 six month completers, 43 twelve month completers

a data are mean values (SD).

brange not reported.

Notes

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
College of Medical, Veterinary and Medical and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G31 2ER, UK
(2)
Learning Disabilities Psychiatry, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, Institute of Mental Health & Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 0XH, UK
(3)
Human Nutrition, College of Medical, Veterinary and Medical and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Level 2, New Lister Building, Glasgow, G31 2ER, UK

References

  1. Spanos D, Melville CA, Hankey CR: Weight management interventions in adults with intellectual disabilities and obesity: a systematic review of the evidence. Nutr J. 2013, 12: 132-10.1186/1475-2891-12-132.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar

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