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Table 2 The hazard ratio (95% CI) of CVD events across tertile categories of dietary oxalate and dietary oxalate across different levels of dietary Ca (mg/d)a

From: Dietary oxalate to calcium ratio and incident cardiovascular events: a 10-year follow-up among an Asian population

  Tertile1 Tertile2 Tertile 3 P for trend
Dietary oxalate (median, mg/d) 148 181 277  
Case/total number 49/987 72/990 90/989  
Crude 1.00 1.46 (1.02–2.10) 1.86 (1.31–2.63) 0.002
Model 1 1.00 1.37 (0.95–1.97) 1.65 (1.16–2.34) 0.019
Model 2 1.00 1.37 (0.93–1.89) 1.60 (1.13–2.27) 0.030
Model 3 1.00 1.32 (0.91–1.90) 1.47 (1.02–2.12) 0.105
Dietary oxalate (mg/d)
Low-Ca diet 1.00 1.92 (1.00–3.70) 2.42 (1.19–4.89) 0.046
Medium-Ca diet 1.00 1.18 (0.61–2.28) 1.34 (0.70–2.58) 0.668
High-Ca diet 1.00 1.29 (0.67–2.51) 1.66 (0.86–3.21) 0.306
  1. Tertile 1 was considered as reference. Cox regression models were used. Model 1: Adjusted for CVD-risk score; Model 2: Additionally adjusted for eGFR; Model 3: Additionally adjusted for total energy intakes (kcal/d), dietary intakes of total fats (g/d), and fiber (g/d). Dietary oxalate was included in the models as a Log-transformed variable. Range of Ox intake across tertiles was < 148, 148–220 and > 220 with a median of 120, 181 and 277 mg/d
  2. Low-, medium-, and high-Ca-diet were defined according to tertiles of Ca intakes as < 545, 545–981, and > 981 mg/d, with a median of 760, 1180, 1760 mg/d, respectively
  3. a Full model was only reported